Most Hangover Cures Don't Work According to New Study

UK researchers have bad news for those hoping for a quick hangover fix.

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hangover-party

UK researchers have bad news for those hoping for a quick hangover fix.

© Shutterstock

Most Hangover Cures Don't Work According to New Study

The study, published by the scientific journal Addiction, isn't good news for those still feeling the effects of New Year's Eve but likely to be some comfort for those abstaining for Dry January.

It assessed 21 placebo-controlled randomised trials of clove extract, Korean pear juice and other so-called hangover cures

"Our study has found that the evidence for these hangover remedies is of very low quality and there is a need to provide more rigorous assessment," said lead author Dr. Emmert Roberts. "For now, the surest way of preventing hangover symptoms is to abstain from alcohol or drink in moderation."

Just seven of the 23 substances tested showed any signs of improving symptoms, but even this was unconvincing, the researchers from King’s College London and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust said.

These included Korean pear juice, red ginseng, Pyritinol, a vitamin supplement, HDE, L-cysteine/B and C vitamins, Tolfenamic acid and clove extract.

No two studies reported on the same hangover remedy making any comparison difficult, but clove extract, Tolfenamic acid, and pyritinol may most warrant further study, the researchers said.

The research is available here.

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