Venice Not to Be Included in UNESCO World Heritage's Danger List

Venice Will Not Be Included in UNESCO World Heritage's Danger List 

© Claudio Schwarz | Unsplash

Venice Will Not Be Included in UNESCO World Heritage's Danger List

Venice Will Not Be Included in UNESCO World Heritage's Danger List 

© Claudio Schwarz | Unsplash

Good news for Italy
Over the years, the sustainable development and the future of Venice have been discussed and large cruise ships have been considered one of the main factors threatening the stability of Venice. UNESCO’s announcement was made not long after Italy’s decision to ban all cruise ships over 25,000 tonnes from entering the Venetian lagoon. 

Before the pandemic, Venice was one of the most popular destinations for international tourists. The historic city, with a population of 50,000 citizens, welcomes around 25 to 30 million foreign visitors per year. 

UNESCO demands stronger measures
Although the decision was very welcomed by the Italian authorities and residents, UNESCO will continue monitoring how the government handles tourism to minimise its effect on Venice. UNESCO threatened to put the city on its  World Heritage in Danger list in June 2021.  

Culture minister Dario Franceschini stated that the country would "work for the protection of the lagoon and identify a sustainable development path for this unique reality." If the city does not implement more effective policies to protect Venice, the may city once again be added to the list, which signals the committee's huge distrust in the local management to maintain the site.