The Five Best Goat’s Cheeses in the World

Five Best Goat’s Cheeses in the World 

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Five Best Goat’s Cheeses in the World

Five Best Goat’s Cheeses in the World 

©shutterstock

Goat’s milk is prized for its richness, not only in terms of protein and fat content, but especially for its high calcium content. Since goats can survive poor and dry pastures, they have long been the traditional livestock in both mountainous and dry regions where their milk is turned into various cheeses. Here are five of the best.

Manouri, Greece

This smooth-textured, snow-white cheese originates from western Macedonia and Thessaly in northern Greece. It is made by adding cream to the whey of goat’s milk left over from feta production until it is firm enough to hold its shape. The slightly sour, citrusy taste makes it perfect for heavenly cakes and adds a tangy twist when served with juicy, barbecued peaches drizzled with honey.

Manouri, Greece

Manouri, Greece

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Ticklemoore, United Kingdom

Firm yet smooth, this delightful cheese is hand made in Devon, United Kingdom. The white rind hides a chalky paste right underneath and a crumbly centre. Being hand pressed in a colander gives it a unique shape. After maturing for ten weeks, Ticklemore Goat cheese develops an enticing floral and grassy flavour that will elevate your lunchtime salad to the next level.

Ticklemoore, United Kingdom

Ticklemoore, United Kingdom

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Crottin de Chavignol, France

The history of making goat’s milk cheese goes back to the 16th century in Chavignol, a hamlet in the Loire Valley in France.. This tiny parcel of goodness enjoys protected status, has its own appellation and is still an integral part of local dishes. Slightly acidic with a delicious touch of nuttiness, it goes exceedingly well with beetroot and pistachios – and is also a classic pairing for the local wine, Sancerre.

Crottin de Chavignol, France

Crottin de Chavignol, France

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Scimudin, Italy

Reminiscent of Brie, Scimudin means ‘little cheese’ and is produced in the mountainous Valtellina Valley of Northern Italy. Keeping goats has a long tradition in this part of the Italian Alps. Silky smooth and slightly sweet, it is the perfect topping on freshly baked walnut bread with a smidgeon of blueberry jam: an unmatched culinary experience.

Scimudin, Italy

Scimudin, Italy

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Kilembe, South Africa

This awarding-winning cheese is produced by husband and wife team Rina and Norman Belcher and their 250 Saanen goats on a small farm near Johannesburg. Aged on wooden shelves for six months, this tasty hard cheese reveals a rich, crumbly texture and deep nuttiness. It is delicious when baked in filo pastry with butternut squash and kale.

Kilembe, South Africa

Kilembe, South Africa

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