Ossobuco

Ossobuco

© Lena Staal / Staal & Johs

Ossobuco

Ossobuco

© Lena Staal / Staal & Johs

Ingredients (Serves 4)

1.2
kg
veal slices with bone (prepared for ossobuco by the butcher)
50
ml
extra virgin olive oil
300
g
white onions, finely chopped
600
ml
veal stock
60
ml
dry white wine
40
g
tomato purée
1
bunch
parsley
2
rosemary sprigs
1
teaspoon
black peppercorns
20
g
carrots, finely diced
20
g
celery stalks, finely diced
juice and zest of of half a lemon
50
g
parsley, chopped, to serve
salt

Preparation:

  • In a heavy-based casserole with a lid, sear the ossobuco pieces on both sides in 2 tablespoons of the olive oil. Set aside.
  • Add 280g of the onion to the casserole and cook, stirring until soft but not browned, adding more oil as needed. 
  • Return the browned ossobuco slices to the casserole with the onions. Add the tomato purée and pour in the white wine and veal stock and stir well.
  • Tie the herbs and the peppercorns in a spice bag and add to the casserole. Bring to a simmer, cover with the lid, turn the heat to low and simmer for 4 hours or until the veal is very tender. Season to taste with salt.
  • Meanwhile, mix the carrots, celery and the remaining 20g onions together in a bowl with the lemon juice and lemon zest to make a vegetable vinaigrette.
  • At the end of cooking time, arrange the ossobuco slices on a large platter with the braising sauce. Finish with the vegetable vinaigrette and chopped parsley.
  • The ideal accompaniment to the ossobuco is a risotto Milanese with saffron.

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